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Basic Worldview:
104 Why Christianity?


Koran Contradicts Judeo-Christianity (Part 3)

Evidentiary Religions - Islam Introduction
Koran and Judeo-Christian Apostles
Koran and Judeo-Christian Scriptures
Koran Contradicts Judeo-Christianity (Part 1)
Koran Contradicts Judeo-Christianity (Part 2)
Koran Contradicts Judeo-Christianity (Part 3)
Koran Contradicts Judeo-Christianity (Part 4)
Another Gospel and Explaining the Success of Islam (P. 1)
Explaining the Success of Islam (Part 2)
Explaining the Success of Islam (Part 3)
Islam Conclusions

Introduction
| Section 1 | Section 2 | Section 3




Clear Contradictions on Major Issues

Oddly enough, while the Koran repeatedly affirms and relies upon the Judeo-Christian scriptures, it specifically denies the main premises of both Testaments.

With regard to Judaism and the Old Testament:

1.) The Koran denies the unique position of the Jews as God's Chosen People, uniquely chosen apart from all other nations and descending through Isaac alone.

2.) The Koran denies the necessity of keeping the Law of Moses.

With regard to Christianity and the New Testament, particularly the Gospels:

1.) The Koran denies that Jesus is the Son of God and the Trinitarian view of God.

2.) The Koran denies that Jesus was crucified to atone for men's sins and that he rose from the dead three days later.

Consequently, by denying Numbers 1 and 2 above, the Koran actually denies the Gospel message itself, which the Koran repeatedly affirms and relies upon as a predecessor.

The goal of this segment is to highlight these contradictions between the Koran and the major, foundational ideals found in the Judeo-Christian scriptures, which the Koran repeatedly claims are reliable revelations of God's Word.


Contradictions with Judaism:
Uniquely Chosen Through Isaac

Even though the Koran acknowledges that God has blessed and exalted the Jewish people, it also denies their uniqueness in this regard. First, we should note that in the Judeo-Christian scriptures, God has specifically chosen the Jews to be his people in way that He has not done with any other people.

Deuteronomy 7:1 When the LORD thy God shall bring thee into the land whither thou goest to possess it, and hath cast out many nations before thee, the Hittites, and the Girgashites, and the Amorites, and the Canaanites, and the Perizzites, and the Hivites, and the Jebusites, seven nations greater and mightier than thou...3 Neither shalt thou make marriages with them; thy daughter thou shalt not give unto his son, nor his daughter shalt thou take unto thy son. 4 For they will turn away thy son from following me, that they may serve other gods: so will the anger of the LORD be kindled against you, and destroy thee suddenly...6 For thou art an holy people unto the LORD thy God: the LORD thy God hath chosen thee to be a special people unto himself, above all people that are upon the face of the earth.

Deuteronomy 14:2 For thou art an holy people unto the LORD thy God, and the LORD hath chosen thee to be a peculiar people unto himself, above all the nations that are upon the earth.

Notice from Deuteronomy 7 above that the prohibition of intermarriage with surrounding nations is tied together with the assertion of the Jews as "a special people unto God himself, above all people that are upon the face of the earth." The fact that God did not want the Jews to marry in with other nations demonstrates the extent to which God considered them alone to be his people. And keep in mind of course, that the Koran frequently affirms and relies upon the "Book of Moses."

Furthermore, this relationship was inherited solely through Abraham's son Isaac while Abraham's son Ishmael was deliberately and explicitly excluded from the relationship.

Genesis 17:18 And Abraham said unto God, O that Ishmael might live before thee! 19 And God said, Sarah thy wife shall bear thee a son indeed; and thou shalt call his name Isaac: and I will establish my covenant with him for an everlasting covenant, and with his seed after him. 20 And as for Ishmael, I have heard thee: Behold, I have blessed him, and will make him fruitful, and will multiply him exceedingly; twelve princes shall he beget, and I will make him a great nation. 21 But my covenant will I establish with Isaac, which Sarah shall bear unto thee at this set time in the next year.

Genesis 21:9 And Sarah saw the son of Hagar the Egyptian, which she had born unto Abraham, mocking. 10 Wherefore she said unto Abraham, Cast out this bondwoman and her son: for the son of this bondwoman shall not be heir with my son, even with Isaac. 11 And the thing was very grievous in Abraham's sight because of his son. 12 And God said unto Abraham, Let it not be grievous in thy sight because of the lad, and because of thy bondwoman; in all that Sarah hath said unto thee, hearken unto her voice; for in Isaac shall thy seed be called. 13 And also of the son of the bondwoman will I make a nation, because he is thy seed. 14 And Abraham rose up early in the morning, and took bread, and a bottle of water, and gave it unto Hagar, putting it on her shoulder, and the child, and sent her away: and she departed, and wandered in the wilderness of Beersheba.

Notice that in both Genesis 17 and Genesis 21, God does promise to bless Ishmael and make him a great nation because he is Abraham's son. However, it is equally clear from both passages that God is establishing his covenant ONLY with Isaac and NOT with Ishmael. This covenant with Isaac is to be everlasting. And in this way, Isaac's descendants will be in a unique covenant relationship with God that is not shared by Ishmael's descendants or any other nation.

In contrast to the unique place of Isaac in the Judeo-Christian scriptures, the Koran frequently presents Ishmael as an equal son of Abraham side by side with Isaac. In the Bible Ishmael is viewed as a child born of natural rather than supernatural means. Ishmael is not promised to Abraham by God but instead, he is born outside the promise of God as a result of Abraham attempting to accomplish on his own through natural means what God's promised to do for him through supernatural means. In the Bible, the birth of Ishmael results not from God answering a prayer, but from Abraham's impatience with waiting for God to provide him a son through Sarah.

Genesis 16:1 Now Sarai Abram's wife bare him no children: and she had an handmaid, an Egyptian, whose name was Hagar. 2 And Sarai said unto Abram, Behold now, the LORD hath restrained me from bearing: I pray thee, go in unto my maid; it may be that I may obtain children by her. And Abram hearkened to the voice of Sarai...4 And he went in unto Hagar, and she conceived: and when she saw that she had conceived, her mistress was despised in her eyes.

By contrast, in the following passage from the Koran, Abraham rejoices as if Ishmael and Isaac were both promised children supernaturally given by God, even though in the Bible only Isaac is viewed as the child of God's supernatural promise.

Praise be to God who has given me Ishmael and Isaac in my old age! All prayers are heard by Him. Lord, make me and my descendants steadfast in prayer. Lord, accept my prayer. Forgive me, Lord, and forgive my parents and all the faithful on the Day of Reckoning.' (Koran, p. 182, 14:30, 4th Para. - 14:36, 6th Para.)

In the Koran, Abraham and Ishmael are depicted as Abraham's coworker in devout service of God. Together Abraham and Ishmael build the Sacred House known as the Ka'bah and dedicate it to God.

"Abraham - According to the Qur'an, Abraham and Ishmael built the Kaaba in Mecca and instituted pilgrimages there." The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001.

"Kaaba - According to Islamic tradition, Abraham and Ishmael, his son by Hagar, built the Ka'bah as the house of God." - Britannica.com

We made the House (1) a resort and a sanctuary for mankind, saying: 'Make the place where Abraham stood a house of worship.' We enjoined Abraham and Ishmael to cleanse Our House for those who walk around it, who meditate in it, and who kneel and prostrate themselves. (Koran, p. 22, 2:122, 5th Para.) (Footnote 1: The Ka'bah at Mecca.)

Abraham and Ishmael built the House and dedicated it, saying 'Accept this from us, Lord.You are the One that hears all and knows all. Lord, make us submissive to You. Teach us our rites of worship and turn to us with mercy; You are the Forgiving One the Merciful. Lord, send forth to them an apostle of their own who shall declare to them Your revelations, and shall instruct them in the Book and in wisdom, and shall purify them of sin. You are the Mighty, the Wise One. (Koran, p. 22, 2:127.)

The quote below states that Ishmael was a prophet and an apostle who rightly guided his own people, which again indicates equality between Ishmael and his descendants and Isaac and his descendants.

And in the Book you shall tell of Ishmael: he, too, was a man of his word, an apostle, and a prophet. He enjoined prayer and almsgiving on his people, and his Lord was pleased with him. (p. 217, 19:54, 1st Para. - 2nd Para.)

In the passages below, the Koran lists Ishmael side by side with Abraham's other descendants who were the heirs of the covenant with God including Isaac, Jacob, and the tribes of Israel.

We have revealed Our will to you as We revealed it to Noah and to the other prophets who came after him; as We revealed it to Abraham, Ishmael, Isaac, Jacob, and the tribes; to Jesus, Job, Jonah, Aaron, Solomon and David, to whom We gave the Psalms. (Koran, p. 77, 4:163, 1st Para.)

Say: We believe in God and that which has been revealed to us; in what was revealed to Abraham, Ishmael, Isaac, Jacob, and the tribes; to Moses and Jesus and the other prophets by their Lord. We make no distinction among any of them, and to Him we submit.' (Koran, p. 23, 2:132, 4th Para. - 2:136.)

Say: 'We believe in God and what is revealed to us; in that which was revealed to Abraham and Ishmael, to Isaac and Jacob and the tribes; and in that which their Lord gave Moses and Jesus and the prophets. We discriminate against none of them. Too Him we have surrendered ourselves.' He that chooses a religion other than Islam, it will not be accepted from him and in the world to come he will surely be among the losers. (p. 50, 3:83, 1st Para. - 3rd Para.)

The phrase "we discriminate against none of them" in the previous two paragraphs is indicative of the fact that in the Koran, Ishmael is viewed as equal to Isaac.

It is true that the Koran does state that God blessed the Jews with prophethood and exalted them above the nations.

We gave him Isaac and Jacob and bestowed on his descendants prophethood and the Book. We gave him his reward in this life, and in the life to come he shall dwell among the righteous. (p. 280, 29:27.)

We gave the Book to the Israelites and bestowed on them wisdom and prophethood. We provided them with wholesome things and exalted them above the nations. We gave them clear commandments: yet it was not till knowledge had been vouchsafed them that they disagreed maliciously among themselves. (p. 351, 45:11, 5th Para. - 45:18, 2nd Para.)

Children of Israel, remember the favour I have bestowed upon you, and that I exalted you above the nations. Guard yourselves against a day on which no soul shall stand for another: when no ransom shall be accepted from it, no intercession avail it, no help be given it. (p. 22, 2:122.)

However, it is also true that the Koran repeatedly states that the Jews are not unique among the nations in this regard.

We gave him Isaac and Jacob and guided both as We had guided Noah before them. Among his descendents were David and Solomon, Job and Joseph and Moses and Aaron (thus do we reward the righteous); Zacharias and John, Jesus and Elias (all were upright men); and Ishmael, Elisha, Jonah and Lot. All these We exalted above the nations as We exalted some of their fathers, their children, and their brothers. We chose them and guided them to a straight path...On those men We bestowed the Scriptures, wisdom, and prophethood. (p. 100, 6:80, 3rd Para. - 6:91, 1st Para.)

In the quote above, Ishmael is listed among those God bestowed the scriptures, wisdom, and prophethood upon. Along with the others on the list, Ishmael is said to have been "chosen" by God and "exalted above the nations." Such a statement clearly elevates Ishmael and his descendants to a similar status as Isaac and the Jews, whom Deuteronomy refers to as a "chosen" and "special people unto himself, above all people that are upon the face of the earth."

And not only are Ishmael and his descendants elevated to the same status as the Jews, but the Koran also asserts that God frequently deals with all the nations in this way.

We have recounted to you the history of those nations. Their apostles came to them with veritable proofs, yet they persisted in their unbelief. Thus God seals up the hearts of the unbelievers. (p. 117, 7:96, 5th Para. - 6th Para.)

The unbelievers ask: 'Why has no sign been sent down to him by his Lord?' But you are only to give warning. Every nation has its mentor. (p. 175, 13:5, 4th Para.)

It was We that revealed the Admonition, and shall Ourself preserve it. We have sent forth apostles before you to the older nations: but they scoffed at each apostles We sent them. Thus do We put doubt into the hearts of the guilty: they deny him, despite the example of the ancients. (p. 184, 15:6, 3rd Para.)

By the Lord, We have sent apostles before you to other nations. But Satan made their foul deeds seem fair to them, and to this day he is their patron. A woeful scourge awaits them. (p. 191, 16:62, 2nd Para.)

Nor did we destroy the nations until He had sent apostles to their capital cities proclaiming to them Our revelations. We destroyed those cities only because their inhabitants were wrongdoers. (p. 276, 28:58, 2nd Para.)

Have they never journeyed through the land and seen what was the end of those who have gone before them, nations far greater in prowess and in splendour? God scourged them for their sins, and from God they had no protector. That was because their apostles had come to them with veritable signs and they denied them. So God smote them. (p. 329, 40:18, 2nd Para. - p. 330, 40:26.)

How many nations have rebelled against the commandments of their Lord and His apostles! Stern was our reckoning with them, and harrowing was Our scourge. (p. 397, 65:7, 2nd Para. - 3rd Para.)

From the above quotes we can see not only that Ishmael is described as "chosen," "exalted above the nations," and "bestowed prophethood," but also that God sends apostles to virtually every nation declaring to them his revelations. So, according to the Koran, God is not dealing uniquely with the Jews nor are they uniquely the recipients of his "chosing" or his prophets or his divine revelations. The only extent to which the Jews are unique in the Koran is perhaps that they simply have a greater number of apostles that we know by name.

And by denying the unique status of the Jews as unique recipients of prophethood, of being "chosen" by God, of being exalted above the nations, and of receiving divine revelation, the Koran contradicts one of the main, fundamental teachings of Moses and the Old Testament, despite the fact that the Koran indiscriminately and unreservedly affirms the Book of Moses claiming that it is a reliable revelation of God's Word.


Contradictions with Judaism:
Obligation of the Law of Moses

While the authors of the New Testament including Paul in particular spend a considerable amount of time explaining how the coming of Jesus Christ has brought an end to the regulations of the Law of Moses, the Koran spends absolutely no time addressing this question. (For more information about how Christ Jesus removed and replaced the Law of Moses, please visit our article series on the Redemption.)

This absence of an explanation for why Muslims don't have to keep the Law of Moses is most significant despite the fact that the Koran repeatedly claims to put forth all manner of arguments and to explain all previous scriptures.

Most of them follow nothing but mere conjecture. But conjecture is in no way a substitute for truth. God is cognizant of all their actions. This Koran could not have been devised by any but God. It confirms what was revealed before it and fully explains the Scriptures. It is beyond doubt from the Lord of the Universe. If they say: 'He invented it himself,' say: 'Bring me one chapter like it. Call on whom you may besides God to help you, if what you say be true!' (p. 150, 10:35, 3rd Para. - 5th Para.)

Say: 'If men and jinn combined to produce a book akin to this Koran, they would surely fail to produce its like, though they helped one another as best they could.' We have set forth for men in this Koran all manner of arguments, yet most of them persist in unbelief.(p. 203, 17:83, 5th Para. - 17:97.)

In this Koran we have set forth for men all manner of arguments. Yet if you recite to them a single verse, the unbelievers will surely say: 'You preach nothing but falsehoods.' Thus God seals the hearts of ignorant men. (p. 288, 30:56, 3rd Para.)

This Koran expounds to the Israelites most of the matters over which they disagree. It is surely a guide and a blessing to true believers. You Lord will rightly judge them. He is the Mighty One, the All-knowing. Therefore put your trust in God; yours is surely the path to the glorious truth. (p. 269, 27:69 - 27:79.)

Of course, the last passage above specifically states that the Koran explains to the Israelites the matters over which they disagree. Based upon this statement, you would think that the Koran would explain why Muslims are not required to keep the Law. The need for such an explanation is highlighted even more by the fact that the Law of Moses is a large part of what the Israelites disagreed about including the disagreement between early Jewish Christians and their fellow Jews.

But moreover, the Koran needs to explain why Muslims are not required to keep the Law of Moses given the following 4 facts:

1.) The Koran asserts that the Book of Moses is "a guide...to men of understanding."

We gave Moses Our guidance and the Israelites the Book to inherit: a guide and an admonition to men of understanding. (p. 332, 40:52, 2nd Para. - 3rd Para.)

2.) The Koran asserts that the Book of Moses is "a perfect code for the righteous with precepts about all things."

To Moses We gave the Scriptures, a perfect code for the righteous with precepts about all things, a guide and a benison, so that they might believe in meeting their Lord. (p. 107, 6:153, 2nd Para. - 6:157, 1st Para.) (Footnote 1: Christians and Jews.)

3.) The Koran asserts that the Book of Moses is not just for the Jews, but "a light and a guide for mankind."

They have no true notion of God's glory, those that say: 'God has never revealed anything to a mortal.' Say: 'Who, then, revealed the Scriptures which Moses brought down, a light and a guide for mankind? You have transcribed them on scraps of paper, declaring some and suppressing much, though now you have been taught what neither you nor you fathers knew before.' (p. 100, 6:80, 3rd Para. - 6:91, 1st Para.)

After We had destroyed the first generations We gave the Book to Moses as a clear sign, a guide and a blessing for mankind, so that they might take thought. You were not present on the western side of the Mountain when We charged Moses with his commission, nor did you witness the event. (p. 274, 28:39, 3rd Para. - 28:45.)

4.) The Koran asserts that Muslims believe in what was revealed to Moses without discriminating. But how can Muslims believe in what was revealed to Moses while not practicing what was revealed by Moses?

They say: 'Accept the Jewish or the Christian faith and you shall be rightly guided.' Say: 'By no means! We believe in the faith of Abraham, the upright one. He was no idolater.' Say: We believe in God and that which has been revealed to us; in what was revealed to Abraham, Ishmael, Isaac, Jacob, and the tribes; to Moses and Jesus and the other prophets by their Lord. We make no distinction among any of them, and to Him we submit.' (p. 23, 2:132, 4th Para. - 2:136.)

Are they seeking a religion other than God's, when every soul in the heaven's and the earth has submitted to Him willingly or by compulsion? To Him shall they return. Say: 'We believe in God and what is revealed to us; in that which was revealed to Abraham and Ishmael, to Isaac and Jacob and the tribes; and in that which their Lord gave Moses and Jesus and the prophets. We discriminate against none of them. Too Him we have surrendered ourselves.' He that chooses a religion other than Islam, it will not be accepted from him and in the world to come he will surely be among the losers. (p. 50, 3:83, 1st Para. - 3rd Para.)

So, the question arises, if Moses gave a Law and Muslims believe in what was revealed to Moses and regard it as a "guide" for the "righteous," for "men of understanding," and for "mankind" concerning "all things," then why don't Muslims have to follow the Law that God revealed to Moses?

And on this point the lack of explanation from the Koran creates a conflict, particularly because the Koran specifically instructs Muslims not to keep the religions of the Jews, which is the Law of Moses. Consider the following statements from the Koran in which Muslims are forbidden to practice the religion of the Jews.

They say: 'Accept the Jewish or the Christian faith and you shall be rightly guided.' Say: 'By no means! (p. 23, 2:132, 4th Para. - 2:136.)

Are they seeking a religion other than God's, when every soul in the heaven's and the earth has submitted to Him willingly or by compulsion? To Him shall they return. Say: 'We believe in God and what is revealed to us; in that which was revealed to Abraham and Ishmael, to Isaac and Jacob and the tribes; and in that which their Lord gave Moses and Jesus and the prophets. We discriminate against none of them. Too Him we have surrendered ourselves.' He that chooses a religion other than Islam, it will not be accepted from him and in the world to come he will surely be among the losers. (p. 50, 3:83, 1st Para. - 3rd Para.)

You will please neither the Jews nor the Christians unless you follow their faith. Say: 'God's guidance is the only guidance.' And if after all the knowledge you have been given you yield yourselves to their desires, there shall be none to help or protect you from the wrath of God. Those to whom We have given the Book, and who read it as it ought to be read, truly believe in it; those that deny it will surely be the losers." (p. 21, 2:121.)

Say: 'Unbelievers, I do not worship what you worship, nor do you worship what I worship. I shall never worship what you worship, nor will you ever worship what I worship. You have your own religion, and I have mine.' (p. 433, 109:1 - 109:6.)

Believers, take neither the Jews nor the Christians for your friends. They are friends with one another. Whoever of you seeks their friendship shall become one of their number. God does not guide the wrongdoers. (p. 85, 5:51, 1st Para.)

Since Muslims are forbidden to practice Judaism, how could they keep the Law of Moses? And again, it begs the question, why are Muslims free from having to keep a Law which they believe in and regard as a "guide" for the "righteous," for "men of understanding," and for "mankind" concerning "all things"?

This is a conflict for the Koran on 2 levels. First, it is a conflict in the sense that the Koran contradicts the Jewish scriptures because it forbids Muslims from keeping a Law, which the scriptures of the Jews require. Second, it is a conflict in the sense that the Koran contradicts itself since it declares that what was revealed to Moses is believed in by Muslims and is a "guide" for the "righteous," for "men of understanding," and for "mankind" concerning "all things" yet at the same time it forbids Muslims from practicing the Law of Moses.

So, as we have seen the Koran denies and contradicts two of the main, fundamental teachings of the Old Testament. First, the Koran denies the unique position of the Jews as God's Chosen People, uniquely chosen from apart from all other nations and descended from Isaac alone. And second, the Koran denies the necessity of keeping the Law of Moses and even forbids it.


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