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Basic Worldview:
103 Science, the Bible,
and Creation



Origins Debate: Figures and Illustrations

Main Article Sections

> Origins - Section One
> Origins - Section Two
> Origins - Section Three
> Origins - Section Four
> Origins - Section Five
> List of Evidences


Gene Pool Figures 1-6

> Gene Pool Figure 1
> Gene Pool Figure 2
> Gene Pool Figure 3
> Gene Pool Figure 4
> Gene Pool Figure 5
> Gene Pool Figure 6

NOTE: This series of illustrations highlights the critical area of disagreement between creationism and evolution - whether kinds of organisms can only reproduce after their kind or if new kinds of organisms emerge from different kinds of organisms.


Defining the Boundaries of Kinds Figure 1

> Defining the Boundaries of Kinds Figure 1

NOTE: This illustration depicts the creationist model of "kinds" of organisms in respect to genetic potential and variation (speciation). The center of the diagram represents the kind as it was originally created. It is highly heterozygous possessing a high degree of genetic variation. Moving towards the edge of the diagram represents a lessening of genetic potential in specific populations as natural selection (through factors like geographic isolation) cause specific populations of the kind to become more and more homozygous. The result is the emergence of different varieties of the kind as produced by limited genetic potential within each specific population. This may, in some cases, eventually result in a potential loss of ability to interbreed with some or all of the rest of the kind.


Gaps in the Fossil Record Figure 1

> Gaps in the Fossil Record Figure 1

NOTE: This illustration depicts that contrary to the theory of evolution, kinds of organisms do not evolve over time into new organisms. Instead, each kind of organism appears abruptly in the fossil record and then remains unchanged for as long as the fossil record of that species lasts.


Britannica Encyclopedia - Table 4: Geologic Time Scale

> Britannica Geologic Column Figure 1

NOTE: This table from Britannica Encyclopedia depicts the different eons, eras, periods, epochs, and ages of the geologic column. (From Encyclopaedia Britannica 2004 Deluxe Edition, article: "Dating, General considerations, Correlation, Geologic column and its associated time scale.")


Misperceptions of Dating Methods

> Misperceptions of Dating Methods Figure 1
> Misperceptions of Dating Methods Figure 2
> Misperceptions of Dating Methods Figure 3
> Misperceptions of Dating Methods Figure 4
> Misperceptions of Dating Methods Figure 5
> Misperceptions of Dating Methods Figure 6
> Misperceptions of Dating Methods Figure 7
> Misperceptions of Dating Methods Figure 8

NOTE: This series of illustrations depicts the common misconceptions and over-simplifications that exist regarding radiometric dating, relative dating, and the geologic column.


Dating Facts Figure 1

> Dating Facts Figure 1

NOTE: This image lists some of the key facts and complications regarding dating processes, which most people are probably not aware of.


Dating Procedures Figures 1-13

> Dating Procedures Figure 1
> Dating Procedures Figure 2
> Dating Procedures Figure 3
> Dating Procedures Figure 4
> Dating Procedures Figure 5
> Dating Procedures Figure 6
> Dating Procedures Figure 7
> Dating Procedures Figure 8
> Dating Procedures Figure 9
> Dating Procedures Figure 10
> Dating Procedures Figure 11
> Dating Procedures Figure 12
> Dating Procedures Figure 13

NOTE: This series of illustrations corrects the false perceptions about dating methods by accurately explaning how radiometric dating and relative dating actually work and how the geologic column is actually created. Emphasis is placed on the circular reasoning and critical assumptions that are key to producing the long timeframe necessary for the theory of evolution.


Isotope Dating Chart Figure

> Isotope Dating Chart Figure

NOTE: Dating methods can be categorized according to those methods that use isotopes of long half-lives to date igneous and metamorphic rock and those methods that use isotopes of short half-lives to date sedimentary rock. This chart depicts those resulting categories of isotope pairs, the timescales they are applied to, and the types of items that they are used to date.


Cosmology Figure 1

> Cosmology Figure 1

NOTE: This illustration depicts that galaxies are arranged around the Milky Way at evenly-spaced concentric shells indicating that we are near the center of the universe.


Cosmology Figures 2a-2d

> Cosmology Figure 2a
> Cosmology Figure 2b
> Cosmology Figure 2c
> Cosmology Figure 2d

NOTE: This series of illustrations depicts that a universe, which is only partially filled with matter, will have a gravity well resulting in an enormous time dilation occuring near the center of the universe.

Cosmology Figures 3a-3f

> Cosmology Figure 3a
> Cosmology Figure 3b
> Cosmology Figure 3c
> Cosmology Figure 3d
> Cosmology Figure 3e
> Cosmology Figure 3f


NOTE: This series of illustrations depicts that the quantization of redshifts from Earth is a unique phenomenon that can only occur at a single location in the universe. These observations are incompatible with the Big Bang model's assumption that the universe is homogeneous.